Canadians for Language Fairness

Banner
End the unfairness of official bilingualism. Stop wasting our tax dollars.

My original letter of complaint:

April 22, 2013

Dear Mr. Graham Fraser:

Please consider this a formal complaint from a Canadian citizen about the Federal government not following the correct protocol regarding the Federal Identity Policy (FIP). 

After seeing the following press release, I noticed what appeared to be a logo of some sort with the French preceding the English as shown in the photo.

On further investigation of various web sites owned by or operated by the Canadian Tourism Commission such as:

Canada Travel

Canadian Tourism Commission

Keep Exploring

Canadian Tourism Commission / LinkedIn

It is obvious that what is depicted in the picture is in fact the logo for the Canadian Tourism Commission (note that the title of these images in all cases is "logo").  

As the Commission is headquartered in Vancouver and because it deals with issues of national and international scope, in accordance with the FIP, English should be on top and French on the bottom.

As such, the Commission's current logo is in violation of the FIP.

I trust that your office will look into the matter and have the appropriate corrections made to the Commission's logo in accordance with the Federal Identity Policy.

It is unfortunate that we have to keep reminding the Canadian government that English is the language of the majority and should precede French in accordance with the government's own policy.

Kim McConnell

4004 County Road 16

Fournier, ON

K0B 1G0

______________________________________________________________________________

The Federal Identity Policy has been violated

Minister Fast Promotes Canada as Tourism Destination

Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2013 10:27:04 -0400

To view this document on the department website, please click here

____________________________________________________________________________

From: Kim McConnell [mailto:kimlian@sympatico.ca]

Sent: May 14, 2013 7:23 PM

To: 'graham.fraser@ocol-clo.gc.ca'

Subject: Reply to OCOL

May 14, 2013

Subject:  Complaint re Canadian Tourism Commission - OCOL ref: 2013-0165

Dear Sir or Madam,

In response to your letter of May 8, 2013 (copy attached) replying to my complaint that the Canadian Tourism Commission is not complying with the Federal Identity Policy Program, I respectfully submit that the conclusions that you reached in your letter are incorrect in accordance with the law.

As anyone should know, an Act of Parliament provides the broad framework of the legislation which is then implemented through a series of regulations subsequently established under each respective Act.

In this regard, referring to the Official Languages Act, please note:

Article 29 which states "Where a federal institution identifies any of its offices or facilities with signs, each sign shall include both official languages or be placed together with a similar sign of equal prominence in the other official language."

Article 33 which states "The Governor in Council may make any regulations that the Governor in Council deems necessary to foster actively communications with and services from offices or facilities of federal institutions - other than the Senate, House of Commons, Library of Parliament, office of the Senate Ethics Officer or office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner - in both official languages, if those communications and services are required under this Part to be provided in both official languages."

In Article 29, all federal institutions are to be identified with both official languages but this article says nothing about the respective positioning/order of each language.  However, under Article 33, one then has to consider any regulations that may have been subsequently implemented regarding the positioning/order of each official language and that regulation is the Federal Identity Program Policy.

With respect to the Federal Identity Program Policy (FIPP), the order of the official languages is addressed in Appendix A - Official Languages, Section 2, articles 2.1 to 2.4 which are as follows:

2. Order of the official languages

The order of the official languages in the signature is determined by the type of application and by certain factors, such as location, language of the medium, or distribution. These are set out in articles 2.1 to 2.4.

  • 2.1 Items for which the location determines the order of the official languages in the signature

Within Canada, the order of the official languages in the signature on stationery is determined by the official language of the majority of the population of the province or territory in which the issuing federal office is located. Thus, French appears to the left in Quebec, and English to the left in the other provinces and the territories. However, each Minister may decide whether English should be placed to the left of French or vice versa in the signature on ministerial stationery. The term "stationery" includes items such as letterheads, envelopes, notepaper, complimentary slips and cards, and calling cards (see also article 2.3).

Within Canada, when the item is physically located or based in a province or territory (e.g. a sign or a vehicle) or is intended for use solely in, or pertains principally to, that province or territory, the official language of the majority of the population in the province or territory shall be placed to the left of the other official language.

Canadian offices located abroad shall use both English and French in their signature. Of these, the language placed to the left shall correspond to the one used by the Secretariat of the United Nations in communicating with the country concerned.

  • 2.2 Items for which the language of the medium determines the order of the official languages in the signature
  • When a signature is used in a unilingual English or French medium (e.g. a newspaper or separate but equal unilingual versions of government publications printed in both official languages), the official language of the medium determines the order of precedence of the official languages in the signature. Thus, French will appear to the left of English in the signature in unilingual French media and English to the left of French in unilingual English media.
  • 2.3 Items for which the individual determines the order of the official languages in the signature

Such items include calling cards, complimentary slips and cards. The person whose name is to be printed on these items may decide on the order in which the official languages will appear in the signature and hence in the text.

  • 2.4 Order of the official languages on items for national use, when the languages are presented side by side

As a general rule, the order of the official languages in the signature and text shall be English to the left of French on material intended for national use and distribution. Notwithstanding this general rule, material for national use and distribution may also be produced in two versions (i.e. English/French and French/English) when the volume or range of distribution would warrant the printing of two versions.

Material for national use and distribution may also be produced with French to the left of English when the nature of the material or the specific public for which it is intended would make the use of this format more appropriate.

With respect to the above, since the Canadian Tourism Commission is headquartered in British Columbia, then according to the regulations established in FIPP article 2.1, English should be to the left and French to the right, or English on the top of a logo and French on the bottom.  I note that this is also the case for your office which is located in Ottawa, as on your letterhead, you correctly have English to the left of the Canadian Coat of Arms and French to the right.

Also, since the distribution of material from the Canadian Tourism Commission is intended for national (and international) use and distribution, according to FIPP article 2.4, English should be to the left and French to the right, or English on the top of a logo and French on the bottom.

Based on the above, I respectfully submit again that the Canadian Tourism Commission is in breach of two articles of  the Federal Identity Program Policy regulations that were duly established in accordance with Article 33 of the Official Languages Act, and thus the Canadian Tourism Office is also in breach of the Official Languages Act.

I request that corrective action is taken immediately so that the Canadian Tourism Commission is in compliance with the regulations established in the Federal Identity Program Policy and thus with the Official Languages Act.

Yours truly.

Kim McConnell



Share




LanguageFairness.ca

The various opinions expressed on this website are not necessarily shared by everyone whose photo is displayed.

This website has been visited 179055 times.